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species loss

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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (1): 3–25.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... habitat fragmentation in the temperature zone. Pp. 237-56 in Conservation Biology: The Science of Scarcity and Diversity ed by M. E. Soulé. Sinauer Assoc.: Mass. Conservation Biology: The Science of Scarcity and Diversity 237 56 Habitat loss and species loss: the birds of Sydney 50 years ago...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2010
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2010.023
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-3-6
... for protected species. The on-going loss of these, often tiny reservoirs, is undoubtedly resulting in the loss of native biodiversity by ‘1000 cuts’. ...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (3): 395–407.
Published: 01 June 2017
.... As a consequence, conservation of biodiversity has effectively become the only approach to minimising continued species loss. However, despite the widespread use of the term, there is confusion over its definition, even among disciplines to which the term has become a focus. In Australia, much of the biodiversity...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (1990) 26 (2): 49–53.
Published: 01 June 1990
... (as indicated by increasing soil salinization, wind and water erosion, pollution of water supplies and the loss of soil productivity due to depletion of nutrients) and species loss has usually followed development. If we are to retain nature conservation values and preserve agricultural productivity...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.022
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... Anthropogenic global warming is expected to cause major changes in the phenology of tropical rainforests in the short term and cause significant structural changes in the long term that will result in local species losses and possibly extinctions. Monitoring these changes is labour intensive...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1994.008
EISBN: 0-9599951-9-6
... In the 200 years of European settlement of New South Wales, 28 of 130 species of native mammals that were originally present in the state have disappeared. Twenty-one of these species are still extant in other states, while the other seven are extinct. Regionally, losses have been much greater...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 11–27.
Published: 17 March 2014
... greater than acknowledged. Over most of southern Australia entire avifaunas are threatened with extinction. When allowance is made for habitat loss and degradation, 30 to 90% of bird species across the continent have declined in abundance. The extent of this decline is that the survival of many bird...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 37 (1): 40–74.
Published: 02 June 2014
... was evaluated by assessing the degree of habitat loss, loss of landscape function and resilience through changes to the water cycle, soil and energy flow and the impact of invasive species, diseases and agricultural pollution. Of the 595 vertebrate species verified for these catchments, 6% are introduced, 12...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2010
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2010.011
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-3-6
... in the Sydney region. Clearance of habitat within the region has been severe and many of the original study sites have been lost over time, including the sites of Launcelot Harrison, John Moore and David Woodruff. Loss of sites and species is not only a conservation concern, but leaves some taxonomic problems...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.015
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-6-7
...) most species require free water for larval development. Research from the northern hemisphere suggests climatic changes have already impacted amphibians through changes in breeding phenology, loss of breeding sites, changes in moisture regimes and a possible increased impact of disease. Such impacts...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2007.041
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-0-5
... Since European settlement there have been profound changes to the fauna of semi-arid and arid Australia. Some species have gone extinct, others have become rare or restricted in range and some have increased their range and abundance. Many, but not all, of these changes in species range...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.030
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... Wales, numerical declines at regularly-visited camps, continuing loss of habitat, and culling. Listing the Grey-headed Flying-fox as a Vulnerable species triggers the need for preparation of a Recovery Plan. By having regard to the biological, social and economic consequences of making the plan...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1994.013
EISBN: 0-9599951-9-6
... species, nutrient inputs and by harvesting of timber and other resources. The effects of these alterations on waterbirds vary with species and the type of alteration. Habitats of some species have probably been enhanced, while those of others have degraded. Waterbirds appear to have coped with the changes...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1991
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1991.030
EISBN: 0-9599951-5-3
... Since European settlement the forests of southeastern Australia have been broken up into disjunct islands by clearing. An important result has been the localized loss of some vertebrate fauna. The remaining mammal fauna is closely associated with forests with a dense understorey. In the long...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1999
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1999.062
EISBN: 0-9586085-1-2
... The conservation of diurnal Lepidoptera, mostly butterflies, has recently received attention in Australia since several species are threatened with extinction and declines in abundance. Threatening processes include habitat loss and contraction, weed invasions, changed fire regimes, pesticides...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.061
EISBN: 0-9586085-9-8
... We examine the nature and extent of listings of endangered ecological communities (EECs) under the NSW Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 ( TSC Act ), including the role of endangered ecological communities in conservation from the landscape to species level. We ask how well...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2010
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2010.025
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-3-6
..., and supports species and assemblages not replicated in other parts of the state. Continued clearing of Cumberland Plain Woodland will inevitably result in the loss of these ecological values. ...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022)
Published: 10 May 2022
... structure and floristics, and fire extent and severity among the three territory centres, the percentage large tree loss or severe damage was not substantially different among the territories. Overall, there was a slightly higher percentage of smooth-barked canopy tree species lost or damaged compared...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.034
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... Dasyurus maculatus maculatus is a forest-dependent species, the largest surviving marsupial carnivore on mainland Australia and the sole surviving member of its genus in south-east mainland Australia. It is classified as ‘Vulnerable’ nationally. The species' ecology, and the factors considered...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.087
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
... the relatively large size of these bushland remnants, in all reserves the number of reptile and frog species had declined since urbanisation. The largest losses occurred in the four urban reserves. Seven species predicted to have occurred historically were now only present in the peri-urban site. Some...