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stakeholder management preferences

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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (4): 446–457.
Published: 17 March 2014
.... Pp. 125-145 in Wildlife Tourism: Impacts, Management and Planning, edited by K. Higginbottom. Common Ground Publishing, Brisbane. Wildlife Tourism: Impacts, Management and Planning 125 145 Burns, G.L. and Howard, P. 2003. When wildlife tourism goes wrong: A case study of stakeholder...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 19–41.
Published: 01 October 2020
...). Inflated Table 1. Key stakeholders concerned with the Kareela flying-fox camp and neighbouring flying-fox camps. Stakeholders Interest Kareela flying-fox camp Sutherland Shire Council Public land manager responsible for Kareela flying-fox camp Residents of Mikarie Place and Kannan Place, Kirrawee...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 58–73.
Published: 01 October 2020
... wildlife parks zoological parks Managing non-releasable animals followingABSTRACT rehabilitation: the current management framework in New South Wales, recent trends and a stakeholder consultative review Matthew Mo1 and Robert Oliver NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service, Conservation Branch...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (4): 575–584.
Published: 01 June 2020
.... Subsequently, conservation managers that collaborate with the general public, and consider public attitudes and preferences, will gain community support and increase the likelihood of achieving conservation goals. Despite the evident barriers to conservation action, the study identified the conservation...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 124–138.
Published: 01 October 2020
... to create buffers between the camps and residents being the most preferred camp management option, which was reflected in the final camp management plan (Eco Logical Australia 2015). After four weeks of public exhibition, attracting few responses, the camp management plan was adopted by councillors on 8...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (4): 585–604.
Published: 01 June 2020
... conservation in the future. Conservation managers and other key stakeholders need to capitalise on this information to increase public support for Australian wildlife, and encourage conservation action. Significant associations between attitude and some sociodemographic characteristics were observed, however...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 12–18.
Published: 01 October 2020
... manage, store, visualise and analyse animal location data. The majority of the data stored in the facility has been collected by animal-borne satellite biotelemetry devices (i.e. GPS and ARGOS), but other types of individual-based location data (mark-recapture, VHF, Acoustic) have also been uploaded...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (3): 477–487.
Published: 01 June 2017
... of land allocation guidelines representing the preferences of different stakeholders in relation to the issues that made planning necessary (Cocks and Ive 1996; see also Cocks et al. 1995). Thus, a conservation (or related land use) option for a place gains credit for not only its biodiversity...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020)
Published: 25 August 2020
...Bradley P. Smith; Robert G. Appleby; Neil R. Jordan ABSTRACT Where wild carnivores such as the Australian dingo interact with and impact on livestock enterprises, lethal control and landscape-scale exclusion are commonly employed. However, interest in alternative non-lethal management approaches...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (1): 18–27.
Published: 04 October 2011
... settings Australian Zoologist 33 446 457 Burns, G.L. and Howard, P. 2003. When wildlife tourism goes wrong: a case study of stakeholder and management issues regarding Dingoes on Fraser Island, Australia. Tourism Management. 24:699-712. When wildlife tourism goes wrong: a case study...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (3): 398–409.
Published: 17 March 2014
... management; rangelands; total grazing pressure; adaptive management Australian 399AustralianZoologist volume 33 (3) 1) More accurate knowledge obtained and communicated to stakeholders on kangaroos contribution to total grazing pressure and the extent to which they compete with sheep; 2) Increased value...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (4): 605–627.
Published: 01 June 2020
... capacity and reporting, as well as the support received from other stakeholders, NSW Wildlife Council (the peak body for the sector), veterinary professionals and government. We found that the volunteer wildlife rehabilitation sector in NSW provides a significant public good that is of high value...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 307–314.
Published: 14 October 2011
... the range of management options and argue that conservation biologists sometimes prefer “sins of omission”, failing to take action, with attendant risks, over “sins of commission”, taking actions that might backfire. Tasmanian devil Sarcophilus harrisii facial tumour disease wildlife disease...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (2): 119–124.
Published: 10 October 2011
...Peter Phillips; Philip Hauser; Mike Letnic This paper reports upon an operation to displace camps of Black Flying-foxes Pteropus alecto using non-lethal methods from the town of Batchelor. The flying-foxes showed a preference for camping in African Mahogany trees Khala senegalensis . Flying-foxes...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020)
Published: 14 July 2020
... towards kangaroo management has found that the public show a strong preference for the carcasses to be used if they are killed (Lunney 2010, McLeod and Sharp 2014). Approval of reintroducing dingoes to manage kangaroos and foxes was generally high. Within the broader survey of which this study forms...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2019) 40 (1): 92–101.
Published: 01 January 2019
.... These conflicting interests and values are a significant barrier to dingo conservation and must be considered in any local management, but this should not be at the cost of ignoring the perspectives and values of other stakeholders. Conclusion The case of the dingo reveals how species identity, and the values...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (1): 113–120.
Published: 17 March 2014
... of MPAs. The GBRMP Act requires the Authority to take such factors into consideration. A related question is whether it is preferable to have a series of small MPAs managed in isolation for protection or preservation of biological diversity or whether it is more effective to have multiple use resource...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (3): 416–432.
Published: 01 May 2020
..., detection dogs can, and are, helping researchers and land managers to collect more robust datasets and better inform conservation decisions. Alliances with unexpected partners in conservation (such as with police forces), citizen science, and timeshare use of dogs might improve the democratisation...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 888–894.
Published: 20 October 2011
... box does not automatically guarantee that a possum will use it, it is currently the best and preferred management option in combination with reducing possum access to roof spaces. Introduced species (e.g. Common Myna birds Acridotheres tristis and European honey bees Apis mellifera) will readily...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2013) 36 (2): 201–208.
Published: 07 February 2013
... and Experience Preferences Chiu, L. and Kriwoken, L. 2003. Managing recreational mountain biking in Wellington Park, Tasmania, Australia. Annals of Leisure Research 6: 339-361. Managing recreational mountain biking in Wellington Park, Tasmania, Australia Annals of Leisure Research 6 339 361...