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systematics

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Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1999
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1999.028
EISBN: 0-9586085-1-2
... The challenges and opportunities to biological systematics that are discussed result from the need to provide information critical to knowledge-based and effective conservation of our flora and fauna, especially invertebrates . Topics covered include: the magnitude of the challenge in terms...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1999
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1999.037
EISBN: 0-9586085-1-2
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2015) 37 (4): 472–484.
Published: 01 September 2015
... of reptiles in Kwongan vegetation of the South- West of Australia, determined through systematic searching and pitfall trapping. M.J. Bamford1,2 & M.C. Calver2 1 Bamford Consulting Ecologists. 23 Plover Way, Kingsley, Western Australia, 6026 bamford.consulting@iinet.net.au 2 School of Veterinary and Life...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2013
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2013.009
EISBN: 978-0-9874309-1-5
... Systematics is fundamental to biology, one must know what one is studying, otherwise how can they be conserved. A discussion is provided on the declining systematic base here in Australia. This is because as the population of Australian systematists ages and becomes grey they are not being...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2010
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2010.010
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-3-6
..., then the use of ranking population status, onto the results from short-term surveys using systematic methodology and finally from surveys undertaken over longer periods of time. Such surveys, considered as repeatable and systematic, can be classed as monitoring surveys. Several such surveys are described...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1993.043
EISBN: 0-9599951-8-8
... such as ozone depletion and it appears that even “pristine” areas are undergoing accelerated extinctions, particularly of amphibians. Wilderness areas in New South Wales provide crucial refuges to a number of endangered reptiles and amphibians. Species inventories and systematic ecological monitoring...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1999
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1999.001
EISBN: 0-9586085-1-2
... groups and for non-vascular plants also vary enormously and often lack real scientific rationale. A more realistic estimate for all species on Earth is about 10 to 15 million species. This paper examines some of the ecological and systematic constraints on clarifying the magnitude of global diversity. ...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.049
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-8-1
... are particularly concerned that this single metric results in systematic suppression of research vital for conservation biology in Australia. We outline the ways by which Journal Impact Factors impact negatively on the kinds of research which underpin the conservation of Australia's biodiversity. We argue...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.004
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... through systematic observation. Simple technologies such as bat banding, and Constantine traps were a great leap forward. Today research faces a potential problem in the immense blossoming of electronic technologies that enable us to measure and record almost anything, but it may fail to genuinely...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1999
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1999.030
EISBN: 0-9586085-1-2
...., Queensland’s exotics are doubled to 36 species, Tasmania’s total is raised from 7 to 25. The various modes of introduction and dispersal are briefly discussed. As much of the continent has yet to be systematically surveyed, it is anticipate d that the tally of exotics will continue to grow, allowing...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2010
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2010.020
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-3-6
... in a marked improvement in the condition of our local vegetation, leading to tangible increases in habitat potential. Recent fauna surveys, including professional systematic and community opportunistic reports, have indicated both an increase in the population and diversity of local indigenous fauna. ...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2013) 36 (2): 242–246.
Published: 07 February 2013
...Pat Hutchings Increasingly our environment is impacted by anthropogenic activities, yet the study of whole animal biology is a neglected field of education together with a lack of support for systematic biology. The consequences of this lack of instruction and the environmental awareness...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 655–678.
Published: 20 October 2011
... listed as threatened under NSW legislation. One hundred and ninety vertebrate species (79% of the total) were recorded during a systematic survey, with the remainder of records from opportunistic survey (18%) or secondary sources (3%). The effectiveness of the systematic survey effort in detecting...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1999
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1999.035
EISBN: 0-9586085-1-2
... , no systematic broad scale variation was apparent. Habitat usage and speciation therefore does not appear to be due primarily to adaptive radiation. ...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2010
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2010.009
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-3-6
... is given of the staff appointed from the museum's inception to the present, together with their interests, which were initially natural history and anthropology, to the current staff who are involved in systematics and phylogeny of various groups using morphological and molecular techniques. Finally...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2010
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2010.031
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-3-6
... forests of ironbark and turpentine trees were sought after as construction timber for the new dwellings of Sydney. The exploitation of the wildlife of western Botany Bay was only the start of its demise. The vast wetlands entrapped behind the coastal dunes were systematically dredged and drained over 100...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.888
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... An ecological survey of tree trunk invertebrates in northern New South Wales was used as a model to demonstrate both the scale of arthropod diversity and the limits of our knowledge. Sticky traps were an effective way of systematically sampling trunk-utilising invertebrates, particularly Diptera...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (2): 280–295.
Published: 01 January 2018
... into systematic conservation planning, and highlight challenges in traditional approaches for protected area designation for conserving nomads. Due to the spatio–temporal dynamism of nomadic species distributions, the projected costs of managing nomads across Australia using traditional, static, protected areas...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (3): 477–487.
Published: 01 June 2017
... planning case studies in the Bateman's Bay region of NSW. Integration of ecosystem services into systematic conservation planning typically can ensure good regional biodiversity outcomes. However, as we increase the estimated value of ecosystem services in localities, the region reaches a tipping point...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.033
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... recorded on the Bass Strait islands. The diversity of species in Tasmania is low compared with mainland Australia reflecting the state's island status, size, location and glacial history. There has been a limited amount of bat research in Tasmania and systematic surveys have not been undertaken across...