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temperature

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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2013) 36 (2): 239–241.
Published: 07 February 2013
...M. Guppy; A. Overs; S Guppy; A. O. Nicholls We document here the effects of an unusual temperature event related to a site in South East NSW that is the subject of a longitudinal study of the breeding biology of woodland birds. In the three breeding seasons before the 2009-10 season we recorded...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 646–657.
Published: 01 December 2018
... are poorly understood. We pitfall-trapped ants in winter and spring over a twenty-two year period (1992–2013) in the Simpson Desert, central Australia. We asked: over what time-scale does ant activity (abundance and species richness) respond to climate (temperature and precipitation) and vegetation (plant...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.011
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-6-7
..., and a bleaching phenomenon common in natural populations near Sydney, Australia. The prevalence of bleaching is positively correlated with water temperature and negatively correlated with concentrations of secondary metabolites in the alga, which are known to inhibit bacteria. Bleaching is associated with a shift...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 369–377.
Published: 14 October 2011
... autumn and spring were compared to a similar study of koalas in summer and winter, also in central Queensland, to generate a seasonal picture of the response of koalas to climatic variation. We also compared the microclimate temperature of a range of food and non-food tree species against daily ambient...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (3): 340–345.
Published: 17 March 2014
... distributions for each species. Tiliqua scincoides and T. rugosa are almost equal in their temperature requirements which are higher than those for T. nigrolutea. Higher precipitation defines the distribution both T. scincoides and T. nigrolutea with the latter having the higher minimum precipitation values...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2016) 38 (1): 95–101.
Published: 01 January 2016
... is influenced by nest box size, shape and entrance dimensions. In this study the temperature and humidity patterns were recorded within six nest box designs that were exposed to direct sunshine. All were constructed of 19 mm plywood but varied in length by a factor of 2X, in volume by 3.5X and in entrance areas...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (4): 480–510.
Published: 17 March 2014
... in the 1960s using fish from the western population. M. adspersa bred in ponds and aquaria at temperatures between 20.0 and 29.9oC (34.0oC at water surface), and in ponds between December and February. An abundant food supply was essential but rising water levels were not required. The elaborate spawning...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (4): 515–528.
Published: 01 June 2020
... of insect feeding strategies, most likely in response to variation in insect abundance and activity, as well as abiotic factors such as light and temperature. *Corresponding authors © 2020 Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales 2020 Flying-foxes diet insects Hemiptera ejecta pellet...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (3): 477–486.
Published: 01 May 2020
... (87.5 % detection rate). Three environmental variables had most influence on detection probability of koalas, including nightly rainfall (-ve), nightly temperature (-ve) and topographic position (lower on ridges). Calling activity peaked at midnight. Sustained site occupancy, at least in the short-term...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.004
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-6-7
... Temperature, rainfall and other climate variables influence the occurrence, range boundaries and behaviour of species, including the timing of natural events, such as migration and breeding. The impacts of climate change have been observed on ecosystems in every ocean and on every continent...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2015) 37 (4): 510–516.
Published: 01 September 2015
.... In addition, they provide a thermal and humidity gradient and allow frogs to move within the mound to select the preferred microhabitat conditions. As mounds temperatures are above ambient temperatures during winter, they may also assist in reducing the susceptibility of over-wintering frogs to chytrid...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (2): 141–165.
Published: 17 March 2014
...L. C. Llewellyn G. rostratus the Murray Jollytail bred in earthen ponds at the Inland Fisheries Research Station, Narrandera, NSW, when surface and bottom water temperatures were above 10.5oC during August and September. Flooding was unnecessary but there was water flow through the pond. Eggs were...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (2): 134–138.
Published: 17 March 2014
...W. A. Buttemer; M. van der Wielen; S. Dain; M. Christy We measured rates of evaporative water loss (EWL) in Litoria aurea at 25, 30, 33, and 35°C. There was a substantial rise in EWL over this range of temperatures, averaging 12.3 and 23.5 mg g -1 h -1 at 25 and 35°C, respectively. The rise in EWL...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.047
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... at the entrance to the roosting sites and air temperatures inside the roosts were measured. It was concluded that all three sites were used by a single population of Bent-wing bats: Cape Banks rarely contained roosting bats, Henry Head was occupied more regularly whereas Malabar was occupied the most often. Cape...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (4): 476–498.
Published: 20 October 2011
...L. Llewellyn Ambassis agassizii (Agassiz's Glassfish) collected from Barren Box Swamp was bred in ponds at the Narrandera Fisheries Centre on ten occasions between 1968 and 1971 when surface water temperatures were 19.0 - 27.0°C, between November and early January, and again in February. Breeding...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (2): 245–250.
Published: 14 October 2011
...Francis Lemckert; Gordon Grigg We recorded the calling activity of frogs at a permanent pond 80 km south of Sydney between 1987 and 1989, documenting the calling seasons of five species and relating calling activity (within calling seasons) to temperature, humidity, barometric pressure and rainfall...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (1): 1–21.
Published: 04 October 2011
...L. Llewellyn Flat-headed Gudgeon Philypnodon grandiceps were bred in ponds and aquaria at the Narrandera Fisheries Centre at temperatures from 18.0 to 28.0°C. Breeding in inland rivers probably occurs between October and April. An abundant food supply was essential for initiating spawning...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1993.019
EISBN: 0-9599951-8-8
... months later using radiotelemetry and two were gravid for a second time in the same breeding season. The soil temperatures adjacent to a natural nest ranged between 28.8 and 33.7°C with a mean of 29.5°C in the mornings (between 0900 and 1000 h) and 31.9°C in the afternoons (between 1600 and 1700 h...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1993.031
EISBN: 0-9599951-8-8
... changes, owing to human influences, are lowering frog numbers and species diversity. Other factors involved include heavy metals, pesticides, salinity, temperature, disease, competition from introduced species and human collection. The complex interactions and synergistic effects of these factors on frogs...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1993.041
EISBN: 0-9599951-8-8
... with adequate space and cover, food, water, and other appropriate environmental conditions such as light and temperature. Their attributes include adaptive capacity to captivity, small size, ease of capture and abundance. Also addressed are animal welfare issues of captive housing and use of native species...