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Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1992
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1992.007
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.008
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1991
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1991.013
EISBN: 0-9599951-5-3
... The aim of this chapter is to encourage an historical view in considering the conservation of Australia’s forest fauna. The settings and opportunities for fauna in today’s forests are closely related to the cutting practices and management regimes of the past. To provide a context...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.043
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... The challenge of equitably managing flying-fox populations and fruit production in today's environment requires balance to align industry, community and environmental needs. The Queensland Flying-fox Consultative Committee provides a forum that brings these interests together to work...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2010
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2010.026
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-3-6
... and it is there today. The first material evidence of a koala seen by Europeans was provided by Barrallier, who obtained some koala paws in November 1802 near Nattai. Nattai is also south-west of Sydney, and is part of a regional stretch of habitat that includes Campbelltown, Nattai, Bargo, and to a lesser extent...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 658–668.
Published: 01 December 2018
... for most bat species. Our third case study used mark-recapture of banded bats to estimate population dynamics in an experimental forest with environmental protection similar to that practised today in NSW forests (protection of riparian zones; habitat trees, rainforest). Analysis of 14 years of annual...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.097
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
... Australia's population and major cities are concentrated along the coastal fringes, mostly on estuaries. As these cities developed, extensive clearing of estuarine/marine wetlands occurred and often all that remains today are isolated stands of wetlands. Their importance is discussed in terms...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2010
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2010.016
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-3-6
... with Sydney at its centre and a radius equal to the distance from Sydney to Kiama: ca. 100 km) in 1788 are compared with those species present or suspected to be present today. Extent of herpetofaunal loss in these reserves over the past 220 years is estimated and correlated with reserve size, showing...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (2): 371–396.
Published: 01 January 2018
..., is that although we are learning fast, the loss of species, landscapes and ecosystems is happening even faster. From the First World Parks Congress in 1962 to today, the interpretation of the value of the national parks for fauna conservation remains contested, but the weight of historical and scientific opinion...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1999
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1999.043
EISBN: 0-9586085-1-2
... Ancient clades with restricted geographic distributions have been found in the isopod crustacean suborder Phreatoicidea. These isopods colonized fresh water in Gondwana by the Triassic Era and today are restricted to permanent groundwaters. A phylogenetic analysis of 21 exemplar species showed...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.004
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... through systematic observation. Simple technologies such as bat banding, and Constantine traps were a great leap forward. Today research faces a potential problem in the immense blossoming of electronic technologies that enable us to measure and record almost anything, but it may fail to genuinely...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2015) 37 (3): 337–342.
Published: 14 April 2015
... rainforests, already ravaged by clearing in the 1800's, was reduced to what is today less than five percent of its original area. In response, the super-flocks became scarce in the early part of the 20th Century. While they were able to adapt by feeding off paddock rainforest trees, another trial came...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (3): 446–461.
Published: 17 March 2014
...L.M. Seabrook; C. A. McAlpine; S. R. Phinn; J. Callaghan; D. Mitchell Present day Australian landscapes are legacies of our colonial history, while future landscapes will be legacies of ecological processes and human impacts occurring today. This paper investigates the legacies of European...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (2): 323–350.
Published: 17 March 2014
... lsland is still open to considerable doubt. Sealing provided the New South Wales colony with its first export industry. It also generated significant local employment. At today's money values the industry up to 1830 would have been worth at least one hundred million dollars. Australian colonial sealing...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (1): 69–99.
Published: 17 March 2014
... been any pronounced fluctuation in numbers. P. cinereus populations experienced diseases similar to those occurring today. Chlamydial diseases were common and occurred in most parts of the State, with cystitis being more common. Some diseases were not clearly identified. In contrast to current...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2012) 35 (4): 1024–1032.
Published: 29 January 2012
... and following WW II was paramount, however, and efforts to do this greatly accelerated the spread of gambusia. The fish established in high densities in areas where undesirable environmental consequences later became apparent, precipitating the disaster for wildlife that we see today. Gambusia...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.009
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-6-7
... initially benefit from an increase in dead coral substrate available. So with climate change and other anthropogenic impacts there are winners and losers, but the long term outlook for coral reefs as we know them today is depressing and will have major impacts on the economy of many developing countries...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 0001
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1988.015
EISBN: 0959995145
... Australia’s three groups of marine mammals — cetaceans, pinnipeds and sirenians — are discussed in relation to historic exploitation, legislative protection, present impacts and potential threats. Today, all marine animals are protected to varying degrees in Commonwealth waters. However...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2010
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2010.024
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-3-6
... by blue gums, blackbutts, turpentines and ironbarks on the richer clay soils. Today council reserves and the tree lined suburbs provide important bio-linkages or corridors between three national parks and smaller reserves within and around the lower north shore. Ku-ring-gai reserves and biodiversity...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2001.014
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-2-7
... remains a primary matter of rural concern today, and this is a concern for all wild dogs and not just dingoes, although no distinction can be made between them in control programs because it is not possible to separate them in the bush. Thus there is no method of selectively controlling wild dogs...