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tolerance

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Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.041
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-8-9
... and/or regrowth than in extensive forest (“decreasers”), seven that showed higher abundance in remnants and/or regrowth than in extensive forest (“increasers”) and 14 whose abundance did not change substantially between the three habitat types (“tolerant” species). The decreasers included three fruit-specialist...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.017
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-6-7
... surveillance programs and developing treatment or management options. Reproductive technologies, validated in zoos, can provide value added census data to inform on population viability and function as well as numbers. Determining species preferences and tolerance limits will also inform the triggers...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (2): 502–513.
Published: 13 July 2022
... rainforests, biasing against the prioritisation of rainforest-dependent threatened fauna for assessment and the allocation of recovery resources. By incorporating the fire tolerance of vegetation communities mapped within the bushfire extent, bushfire severity can be extended to predict the potential...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (2): 462–478.
Published: 13 July 2022
... and taxonomically well known at species level. The principal target group comprised 12 species of Scarabaeinae (dung beetles) which had been listed as potentially significantly impacted by the 2019–20 fires. The results indicate that most species are fire tolerant and no species could be considered threatened...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (3): 876–883.
Published: 20 October 2011
... elevation rainforest, largely based on thermal tolerances and known habitat preferences. This paper reports on the detection of B. marinus over a five-year study in the Border Ranges National Park in northern NSW. More than 400 toads were detected in rainforests at elevations between 810 m and 1130 m...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 94–101.
Published: 01 October 2020
...Gregory S Clarke; Cameron M Hudson; Richard Shine ABSTRACT The potent defensive chemicals of cane toads ( Rhinella marina ) protect them against predators that lack coevolved physiological tolerance to those toxins. That relative invulnerability may explain why major injuries (such as limb loss...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (3): 434–439.
Published: 01 September 2018
...Mark Fitzgerald; Richard Shine ABSTRACT Carpet Pythons ( Morelia spilota ) exhibit substantial geographic variation not only in size and colour, but also in mating systems: reproductive males in some populations battle with their rivals, whereas courting males in other locations tolerate...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (3): 377–380.
Published: 17 March 2014
... as well as the parents. Adults tolerated juveniles (especially neonates) and their presence may confer direct parental protection: on one occasion an adult skink attacked and drove away a tigersnake Notechis scutatus that ventured close to the family's shelter-site. Although our observations are based...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2007.045
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-0-5
... A panel of people who were familiar with the vertebrate fauna of south western New South Wales was formed to assess the status of the extant fauna and to provide details on their habitat requirements and movement ability. They determined that nine percent of the fauna was tolerant...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.038
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
...; therefore, bats (Microchiroptera) adapted to foraging along edges and in open spaces are likely to be less active in regrowth forest. Thinning is an integral component of regrowth management and could reduce structural clutter to a level suitable for bats with a range of clutter tolerances; yet little...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2010
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2010.019
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-3-6
... honeyeaters, large carnivores and exotics are the species that have historically been the most tolerant of urbanisation. The Birds in Backyards project is a research, education and conservation program directed towards the birds that live where people live. Part of the project involves the facilitation...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1991
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1991.006
EISBN: 0-9599951-5-3
... in interspecific associations of animals (e.g., incompatible vs tolerant vs obligate relationships); and distinguish non-human from human factor s promoting change in lineages or ecosystems. Extinction in and conservation of communities steadily diminishing in size and diversity may become anachronisms that must...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1991
DOI: 10.7882/RZSNSW.1991.026
EISBN: 0-9599951-5-3
... of minimal acceptable standards and tolerance limits for environmental damage caused by timber harvesting, to prevent the conversion of natural forests to tree farms by intensification of harvesting practice. With inclusion of these modifications, forest policy in Victoria will have much to offer...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021) 41 (3): 521–533.
Published: 02 February 2021
..., and that threaten dingo conservation (O Neill et al. 2017). Acknowledging human behaviour as a first step in resolving interactions between people and dingoes can be achieved in part by understanding that people come 522 AuZstoraolilaongist volume 41 (3) 2021 Dingo management lessons Figure 1. Human-tolerant K gari...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2013) 36 (3): 364–372.
Published: 04 June 2013
... woodland generalists Phaps histrionica Flock Bronzewing Man Grassland birds Ocyphaps lophotes Crested Pigeon Ag Agriculture tolerant Gallirallus philippensis Buff-banded Rail Water Swamp birds Porzana fluminea Australian Spotted Crake Water Swamp birds Porzana pusilla Baillon s Crake Water Swamp birds...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2021) 41 (4): 738–742.
Published: 02 February 2021
... upon the carcasses of road-killed Cane Toads (Beckmann and Shine 2011; Beckmann et al. 2011), and the Australian avifauna appears to have suffered no ill effects from toad invasion (Beckmann and Shine 2009). Likewise, many rodents (both native and introduced) can tolerate the ingestion of toad toxins...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 35 (1): 96–99.
Published: 04 October 2011
... an Australian estuary, with a comparison of the diets and salinity tolerance of the two most abundant species. Marine Biology117: 515-526. Spatial segregation amongst goby species within an Australian estuary, with a comparison of the diets and salinity tolerance of the two most abundant species Marine...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (3): 550–567.
Published: 27 October 2020
... et al. 2004; Ekernas et al. 2017). In examining these conflicts, it is important to understand social and ecological factors important to carnivore management (Lischka et al. 2018), especially as calls for increased tolerance of carnivores are rising (e.g., Reiter et al. 1999; Manfredo et al. 2009...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (2): 326–351.
Published: 20 May 2022
...). There is also good evidence that the capacity to tolerate wildfires, or at least characteristic regimes (e.g., intensity, type, frequency, and seasonality) has led to co-evolution in animal and plant communities (Whelan et al. 2002, Keith 2012). With respect to Australian frogs however, there has been limited...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 698–712.
Published: 01 December 2018
... frog occurrence in the swamp site. Our current understanding of the influence of pH on amphibian physiology is largely limited to laboratory studies conducted under artificial conditions. Most frog species are tolerant of relatively narrow pH ranges (Barth and Wilson 2010). Laboratory studies suggest...