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urban bats

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Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.090
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
... The Large Bent-wing Bat Miniopterus schreibersii has often been perceived as a native species thriving in our rapidly expanding urban landscape. We used a number of historical and current data sets to assess whether this perception is supported by direct evidence. Investigation of museum...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.043
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
..., little scientific research has been conducted on nest box usage in urban environments in Australia. The present study explored the use of bat boxes by insectivorous bats in urban Brisbane. Over the three-year study, bat box use in Brisbane increased steadily to over 80%. Five of the 22 hollow-using bat...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2011.047
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-4-3
... Over-winter roosting sites for Eastern Bent-wing Bats Miniopterus schreibersii oceanensis occur in urban areas including parts of greater Sydney. Most of the known over-winter roost sites in Sydney are located in the northern and western suburbs (Hoye and Spence 2004). Only one roosting site...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 40 (4): 515–528.
Published: 01 June 2020
... (Riek et al. 2010), which could also apply to P. poliocephalus ability to find large insects in vegetation. In urban environments, artificial light sources have also been shown to have varying effects on behaviour of bats (e.g. Scanlon and Petit 2008, Day et al. 2015). Whilst some insectivorous species...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2004.098
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
... The impacts of urbanisation on the biodiversity of native plants and animals are typically deleterious and potentially profound. These consequences are likely to increase as the size of the human population and geographic extent of many urban areas continue to expand. Unfortunately, the absence...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.046
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
...”; there is a need to both protect flying-fox populations and the crops of fruit growers; and the emergence of Australian Bat Lyssavirus and other viruses has made handling bats a risk. The conservation status of the Grey-headed Flying-fox and the Spectacled Flying-fox is currently being reviewed by the Scientific...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 240–253.
Published: 17 March 2014
... targeted for urban and rural residential development to cater for an ongoing, rapid increase in human population. The conclusion drawn from this study was that Grey-headed Flying-foxes are vulnerable to population decline from the ongoing clearing of their critical over-wintering habitat in lowland coastal...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.045
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... The Grey-headed Flying-fox Pteropus poliocephalus is a large (to 1000 g) bat, endemic to coastal, south-eastern Australia (Queensland, NSW, Victoria). Sustainable management of P. poliocephalus , recently listed at State and Federal level as Vulnerable, must ensure its conservation...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.7882/FS.2002.055
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-4-1
... There is little information available on which to base strategies for managing colonies of Grey-headed Flying-foxes Pteropus poliocephalus in urban areas. Since 1985, the Ku-ring-gai Bat Conservation Society (KBCS) has managed a program of habitat restoration in the flying-fox camp at Ku-ring...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 19–41.
Published: 01 October 2020
... the social and political context of flying-fox camp management, in addition to flying-fox ecology. Key words: Camp management, Grey-headed Flying-fox, human-wildlife conflict, Pteropus poliocephalus, urban ecology DOI: httpsdoi.org/10.7882/AZ.2020.002 Introduction al. 2017). Microchiropteran bats are rarely...
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.7882/9780958608572
EISBN: 978-0-9586085-7-2
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (1): 124–138.
Published: 01 October 2020
.... and Lentini, bad-you-can-taste-it-bats-plague-australian-tourist-town P.E. 2018. Land manager perspectives on conflict mitigation strategies for urban flying-fox camps. Diversity 10: 39. httpsdoi. Anonymous. 2016c. Flying-foxes a natural disaster for NSW org/10.3390/d10020039 town of Batemans Bay. SBS News...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 27 (3-4): 49–54.
Published: 17 March 2014
... South Wales, based on sighting reports 1 9 8 6 1 990 K. A. ParryJones and M. L. Augee Biilogical Science, University of New South Wales, P.O. Box 1, Kensington, New South Wales. Australia 2033 INTRODUCTION Flying-foxes are frequent visitors to urban locations throughout coastal Eastem Australia...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2013) 36 (3): 355–363.
Published: 04 June 2013
.... Atlas of NSW wildlife. The Office of Environment and Heritage, NSW. Threlfall, C., Law, B., Banks, P. 2013. Roost selection in suburban bushland by the urban sensitive bat Nyctophilus gouldi. Journal of Mammalogy 94(2): 307-319. Roost selection in suburban bushland by the urban sensitive bat...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (4): 629–642.
Published: 01 September 2017
...Leroy Gonsalves; Brad Law ABSTRACT The Large-footed Myotis Myotis macropus is a threatened echolocating bat that uses a specialised ‘trawling' foraging strategy to hunt for aquatic prey. While the species is well known in freshwater habitats, in 2014 it was recorded for the first time roosting...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (4): 505–517.
Published: 01 September 2017
... is needed to produce a more nuanced public discourse. © 2017 Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales 2017 Hendra framing human-wildlife conflict media bats flying-foxes 5052017 Australian Zoologist volume 38 (4) Introduction Human-wildlife conflicts pose a growing challenge...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 31 (1): 166–174.
Published: 17 March 2014
... levels of microchiropteran activity from 12 other taxa were recorded. On average, one bat pass was recorded for every minute of sampling in the first hour after dark. Eight taxa ( Vespadeius vulturnus , V. regulus , V. darlingtoni , Chalinolobus gouidii . C. morio , Mormopterus sp. and Tadarida australis...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (2): 272–279.
Published: 01 January 2018
... the number of waste of time and cost more management than it is camps has rocketed from 7 to 20, but it hasn t happened worth to preserve what s left there? consistently. It s happened in a stepwise progression. So our understanding is that the numbers of bats in urban HARRY RECHER: No, they re better than...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2011) 34 (2): 119–124.
Published: 10 October 2011
.... are a prominent component of the urban fauna in eastern and northern Australia (Parry Jones 1987; Markus and Hall 2004). Flying-foxes typically roost during the day in communal camps that range in size from just a few individuals to hundreds of thousands of bats and they may be occupied seasonally...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 30 (3): 300–309.
Published: 17 March 2014
... woodland: clavpan/saltmarsh and disturbed habitat. The survey utilized direct and indirect sampling techniques including live-mammal trapping, hair-tubing, spotlighting ultrasonic bat detection, bird census, active searching and predator scat collection. A total of 129 terrestrial vertebrate species (Seven...