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Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 32 (2): 298–315.
Published: 17 March 2014
... experienced unwanted publicity and some hounding by the press and can confirm how very stressful that can be. So, all in all, I started preparing this paper with very negative feelings about the media. On the transmssion of bat diseases by the media - a view from the trenches Len Martin Department...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2013
10.7882/FS.2013.007
EISBN: 978-0-9874309-1-5
Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2007
10.7882/FS.2007.040
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-0-5
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1993
10.7882/RZSNSW.1993.024
EISBN: 0-9599951-8-8
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 1993
10.7882/RZSNSW.1993.059
EISBN: 0-9599951-8-8
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (1990) 26 (2): 58–59.
Published: 01 June 1990
...: an inland view S. R. Morton CSIRO Division of Wildlife and Ecology, P.O. Box 2111, Alice Springs, Northern Territory 0871 The interior of Australia is a land of soil deficiencies. If it isn't lack of nutrients that dominates biological activ- ity in a particular inland environment, then it's lack of soil...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (1990) 26 (2): 59–60.
Published: 01 June 1990
... settlement on the vertebrate animals of arid Australia: a conceptual model. Proc. Ecol. Soc. Aust. 16: 201-13. RECHER, H. F., 1990. Wildlife conservation in Australia: state of the nation. Aust. Zoo/. 26: 5-11. Wildlife conservation in Australia: the view of a marine ecologist Pat Hutchings Australian Museum...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (1990) 26 (2): 59–60.
Published: 01 June 1990
... settlement on the vertebrate animals of arid Australia: a conceptual model. Proc. Ecol. Soc. Aust. 16: 201-13. RECHER, H. F., 1990. Wildlife conservation in Australia: state of the nation. Aust. Zoo/. 26: 5-11. Wildlife conservation in Australia: the view of a marine ecologist Pat Hutchings Australian Museum...
Journal Articles
Book Chapter
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2017) 38 (3): 318–328.
Published: 01 June 2017
... in the USA, creationist views are now prominent elsewhere and in other religions. Responses by educators include ignoring evolution; excluding evolutionary topics especially provocative to creationist students; advocating evolution while ignoring, disparaging or ridiculing creationism; distinguishing between...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2020) 41 (3): 467–479.
Published: 14 July 2020
... perceived dingoes and their management, how these views compared with other animals managed as pests in Australia, and whether the term “wild dogs” has shaped views and knowledge of dingo management. Most respondents (84.6%) considered dingoes to be native to Australia and there was low approval of lethal...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2018) 39 (4): 784–800.
Published: 01 December 2018
... of either the commercial harvest or culling. While harvesting and culling remain as political matters, our view is that the debate needs to be based on long-term datasets that are readily accessible and reliable. In our view, these datasets not only fulfil that requirement, but are textbook material...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2008
10.7882/FS.2008.006
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-2-9
... of this population of animals had become problematic. Using an Actor-Network approach, different understandings of the koalas on Kangaroo Island were analysed. Several distinct groups, with different views of the koalas and ideas of how the animals should be managed, were active in the discussion as to how...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2010
10.7882/FS.2010.034
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-3-6
... Our answer, to the question: Is the natural history of Sydney so camouflaged that it will not survive? is “yes”. Harry Recher, an active participant in the plenary session, took the view that as the ecosystems around us decline, there will be even less native fauna in the city. There exists...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2014) 33 (4): 436–445.
Published: 17 March 2014
...Valérie Boll The research presented here focused on the ethnozoology of frogs as viewed by two Aboriginal communities: Gängan and Gapuwiyak, which are both located in north-east Arnhem Land (Yolngu territory), Northern Territory. The aim of this research was to record traditional Aboriginal...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (2): 243–255.
Published: 06 May 2022
... released, and the remainder were still in care, but due for release soon. The number of koalas that came into care for reasons not related to the fires over the same time period was 307. From the point of view of each surviving individual koala, the rehabilitation was a success. What the rescue...
Journal Articles
Australian Zoologist (2022) 42 (3): 702–718.
Published: 24 January 2022
... and interviewed about their knowledge and views of wildlife rescue. Users of wildlife rescue services appear to be interested in native animals, highly supportive of wildlife rescue services and willing to contribute to wildlife rescue with time and money. There were notable gaps in their knowledge about wildlife...
Book Chapter
Series: Other RZS NSW Publications
Publisher: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Published: 01 January 2012
10.7882/FS.2012.030
EISBN: 978-0-9803272-8-1
... in the psyche of politicians and managers who view science as a business that generates values measured only in dollars. A consequence of this economic world view is a fixation on economic growth rather than ecosystem well-being. The result in Australia is that wildlife research is being left to the states...