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Table 2.

Estimated population change for species not presently summarized in BBS analyses but that occur in nonnorthern regions. Species are categorized as either 1) primarily southern in distribution; 2) rare, coastal, or nocturnal; or 3) introduced into North America. Analysis is based on log-linear hierarchical models; trend is defined as the change in annual indexes over a specified time period (Sauer et al. 2013). For each species, we present sample size (number of routes, N), trend estimate (% change/yr, 1966–2014), 2.5% and 97.5% credible intervals (CI) for trend, relative abundance (RA, defined as the annual index in the midyear of the interval) and 2.5% and 97.5% CIs for relative abundance, half-width of the CIs for trend, and a credibility score (R = reasonably monitored, Q = questionably monitored (estimates have at least one deficiency), and P = poorly monitored (Sauer et al. 2014). Values <0.1 are indicated as 0.0.

Estimated population change for species not presently summarized in BBS analyses but that occur in nonnorthern regions. Species are categorized as either 1) primarily southern in distribution; 2) rare, coastal, or nocturnal; or 3) introduced into North America. Analysis is based on log-linear hierarchical models; trend is defined as the change in annual indexes over a specified time period (Sauer et al. 2013). For each species, we present sample size (number of routes, N), trend estimate (% change/yr, 1966–2014), 2.5% and 97.5% credible intervals (CI) for trend, relative abundance (RA, defined as the annual index in the midyear of the interval) and 2.5% and 97.5% CIs for relative abundance, half-width of the CIs for trend, and a credibility score (R = reasonably monitored, Q = questionably monitored (estimates have at least one deficiency), and P = poorly monitored (Sauer et al. 2014). Values <0.1 are indicated as 0.0.
Estimated population change for species not presently summarized in BBS analyses but that occur in nonnorthern regions. Species are categorized as either 1) primarily southern in distribution; 2) rare, coastal, or nocturnal; or 3) introduced into North America. Analysis is based on log-linear hierarchical models; trend is defined as the change in annual indexes over a specified time period (Sauer et al. 2013). For each species, we present sample size (number of routes, N), trend estimate (% change/yr, 1966–2014), 2.5% and 97.5% credible intervals (CI) for trend, relative abundance (RA, defined as the annual index in the midyear of the interval) and 2.5% and 97.5% CIs for relative abundance, half-width of the CIs for trend, and a credibility score (R = reasonably monitored, Q = questionably monitored (estimates have at least one deficiency), and P = poorly monitored (Sauer et al. 2014). Values <0.1 are indicated as 0.0.
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