ABSTRACT

Andean Cocks-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruvianus; ACOR) are frugivorous, tropical lekking birds iconic to Andean cloud forests. Little is known about ACOR natural history outside of limited studies focused on their lekking behavior and diet. Given the persisting, detrimental effects of cloud forest deforestation, an increased understanding of ACOR natural history is critical for their conservation. Using capture-mark-resight/recapture (CMR) methods on R. p. sanguinolentus in northwest Ecuador, we determined the apparent annual survival of ACOR males and derived estimates for ACOR male longevity. The 2 top models estimated male ACOR apparent annual survival at 0.98 and 0.97, respectively, and our naïve estimate of survival was 0.87. Furthermore, we found banded ACOR males could persist at the lek for upwards of 14 years. Our results present key information on ACOR vital rates and offer a framework to understand those of related cotingids. Future studies should prioritize elucidating vital rates for ACOR females as well as specific habitat requirements of ACOR and related cotingids to inform specific conservation plans aimed at protecting these species.

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