Research on the ecology of tropical birds, especially those of rainforests, is advancing so rapidly that a new edition of what was an authoritative book in 2001 is well justified. More sophisticated tracking devices, isotope analysis, genetic identification, and the dedication of scientists to long-term projects in population dynamics and individual life history, in habitats with major logistical challenges, are changing the ways we must think about tropical birds, their environment, and their conservation.

The first several chapters of both editions cover, to use the chapter titles, “Why Are Tropical Birds Interesting?,” “Breeding Seasons,” “Life History Traits,” “Mating Systems,” “Territoriality,” “Communication,” and “Biotic Interactions.” The second edition adds chapters on “Intratropical and Altitudinal Migration” and “Behavior and Conservation” and a conclusion asking “Is the Temperate Zone Bias Still a Problem?” This new edition has approximately 575 citations—300 from publications since 2001 (into 2021)—compared to the first edition’s ∼440. These 28...

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